Pulqueria

I know it’s over-priced, over-hyped and over-crowded, but I still love Apotheke. I used to live around the corner, and there’s just something about calling both a bar like Apotheke and Joe’s Shanghai your neighborhood joints, that quiets the rumble of uptowners flocking the place and makes it really feel like your own. When I found out that brother-sister team Christopher and Heather Tierney, the siblings behind Apotheke, were opening a Mexican joint next door, I couldn’t wait to try it.


We all know what they say about good Mexican food in New York City (that there isn’t any!), so I didn’t expect to be wowed by the new Pulqueria, but I couldn’t resist seeing what the new spot was all about. A pulqueria is a mexican bar that serves Pulque, a traditional, milk-colored, alcoholic beverage. In the drink’s heydey, at the start of the twentieth century, many pulquerias were members-only clubs. A fitting name for the new speakeasy on the block.


The food exceeded my minimal expectations (Mexican in New York is one thing, but Mexican in Chinatown?), and the ambiance met my high ones. The super hip dance music of Et Music Pour Touscasted a party-like vibe, while a decorative patchwork of a stylized, Mexican interior brought an air of sophistication. El
egantly presented small plates – my favorite were the tacos de chorizo and the tacos de verduras – were packed with flavor. The highlight was a whole, roasted, market fish, wrapped in banana leaf, accompanied by a simple side of black beans and rice.

The real allure of
Apotheke and Pulqueria for me, however, is not the food and drink, but the location. The corner that the speakeasies call home is known as the “Bloody Angle,” named for a number of gang shootings that occurred early in the twentieth century. Legend has it that a network of underground tunnels used to connect the buildings, offering getaways for gang members on the run or hideaway opium dens. My sights are now set on finding the secret passage way that connects Apotheke and Pulqueria.